Ukiah High SchoolUkiah Unified School District

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School Accountability Report Card

Ukiah High School
1000 Low Gap Rd.
Ukiah, CA 95482-3737
(707) 472-5750
Grades 9-12
2015-16 School Accountability Report Card
Published During the 2016-17 School Year

  

School Description

Ukiah High School is the only comprehensive high school serving the community of Ukiah in the heart of Mendocino County. The 1600 students of UHS are served by 75 teachers, 5 counselor/deans, 3 assistant principals and 1 principal.

Demographically, the school’s student body is 48% Latino, 43% White and 4% Native American. Socio-economically, 60% of the students qualify for free and reduced lunch. These figures represent significant change from six years ago, when the Latino population comprised 33% of the students and 40% of the students received free and reduced lunch services.

14% of our students are English Learners and an additional 23% are reclassified as fluent English language proficient. 11% of UHS students are designated as special education students. Student attendance and graduation data exceed state averages. A-G course completion equals the county and regional levels.

In the Spring of 2015, Ukiah High School completed the accreditation process through the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and received a six-year accreditation.

School Vision and Mission

 Vision Statement:

Our students will impact our world by learning to apply skills, knowledge, and compassion in real life, unpredictable situations.

Our Mission:

As part of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges accreditation process the school developed Expected School-wide Learning Results that serve as the mission.

Students graduating from Ukiah High School will be:

Critical Thinkers who

  • Can identify, organize, analyze, and synthesize data solutions to make decisions and solve problems constructively.
  • Can take information from many sources and identify complexities and discrepancies in the information.

Academic Achievers who

  • Meet or exceed California’s standards in all subjects.
  • Assess their strengths and needs, set appropriate goals, develop an academic plan and use effective strategies to achieve success.

Effective Communicators who

  • Speak with a command of standard English.
  • Utilize appropriate technology.
  • Read and understand grade-level-appropriate material.
  • Write coherent and focused text.
  • Listen effectively.
Responsible, Respectful and Productive Citizens who
  • Respect themselves, others and property.
  • Take responsibility for their own learning and behavior.
  • Contribute time, energy, and talents to improve the quality of life for themselves, their school and the community.

About the SARC

 

By February 1 of each year, every school in California is required by state law to publish a School Accountability Report Card (SARC). The SARC contains information about the condition and performance of each California public school. Under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) all local educational agencies (LEAs) are required to prepare a Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP), which describes how they intend to meet annual school-specific goals for all pupils, with specific activities to address state and local priorities.

 

Additionally, data reported in an LCAP is to be consistent with data reported in the SARC.

  • For more information about SARC requirements, see the California Department of Education (CDE) SARC Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.
  • For more information about the LCFF or LCAP, see the CDE LCFF Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lc/.
  • For additional information about the school, parents/guardians and community members should contact the school principal or the district office.
2015-16 Student Enrollment by Grade Level
Grade Level Number of Students
Grade 9 481
Grade 10 418
Grade 11 350
Grade 12 345
Total Enrollment 1,594
 
2015-16 Student Enrollment by Group
Group Percent of Total Enrollment
Black or African American 1.2
American Indian or Alaska Native 5.3
Asian 1.4
Filipino 0.6
Hispanic or Latino 45.9
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 0.1
White 43.8
Two or More Races 1.8
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 62.5
English Learners 13.2
Students with Disabilities 11.5
Foster Youth 1.1
 
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A. Conditions of Learning

State Priority: Basic

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the Basic State Priority (Priority 1):

  • Degree to which teachers are appropriately assigned and fully credentialed in the subject area and for the pupils they are teaching;
  • Pupils have access to standards-aligned instructional materials; and
  • School facilities are maintained in good repair.
Teacher Credentials
Ukiah High School
  2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2016 - 17
With Full Credential 74 75 71
Without Full Credential 0 0 5
Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence 0 0
 
Teacher Credentials
Ukiah Unified School District
  2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2016 - 17
With Full Credential 307
Without Full Credential 29
Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence 1
 
Teacher Misassignments and Vacant Teacher Positions at this School ***
Ukiah High School
  2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2016 - 17
Teachers of English Learners 0 0 0
Total Teacher Misassignments 0 0 0
Vacant Teacher Positions 1 2 0
*** “Misassignments” refers to the number of positions filled by teachers who lack legal authorization to teach that grade level, subject area, student group, etc.  Total Teacher Misassignments includes the number of Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners.
 

Core Academic Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

2015-16 Percent of Classes In Core Academic Subjects

Core Academic Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers

Location of Classes Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers Not Taught by Highly Qualified Teachers
This School 99.30 0.70
Districtwide
All Schools 95.90 4.10
High-Poverty Schools ** 95.90 4.10
Low-Poverty Schools *** 0.00 0.00
** High-poverty schools are defined as those schools with student eligibility of approximately 40 percent or more in the free and reduced price meals program.
*** Low-poverty schools are those with student eligibility of approximately 39 percent or less in the free  and reduced price meals program.
 
Quality,  Currency, Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials (School Year 2016-17)
Textbooks and Instructional Materials
Year and month in which data were collected: December 2016
Core Curriculum Area Textbooks and Instructional Materials/Year of Adoption
Reading/Language Arts
Literature: Timeless voices, Timeless Themes, Prentice Hall, Adopted 4/12/05

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
Mathematics Glencoe McGraw-Hill Pre-Algebra CCSS Edition (McGraw-Hill Education), Adopted 5/12/16
Glencoe McGraw-Hill Algebra 1 CCSS Edition (McGraw-Hill Education), Adopted 5/12/16
Glencoe McGraw-Hill Geometry CCSS Edition (McGraw-Hill Education), Adopted 5/12/16
Glencoe McGraw-Hill Algebra 2 CCSS Edition (McGraw-Hill Education), Adopted 5/12/16
Algebra/Trigonometry (Addison-Wesley, Prentice Hall), Adopted 4/11/00
Advanced Mathematics, An Incremental Development (Saxon), Adopted 4/12/05,
Saxon Calculus with Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry (Saxon 2002), Adopted 9/13/05

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
Science Science Explorer Earth Science, Prentice/Pearson, Adopted 9/13/05; Exploring Life Science, Prentice Hall, Adopted
4/11/95; Exploring Physical Science, Prentice Hall, Adopted 4/11/95; Chemistry (Houghton Mifflin), Adopted
6/17/08;
World of Chemistry (McDougal Littell, c. 2008), Adopted 6/17/08; Prentice Hall Biology, Prentice/Pearson Ed.
2008,
Adopted 6/17/08; Physics: Principles with Applications, Prentice/Pearson, Adopted 6/21/05, Environmental Science:
Earth as a Living Planet, John Wiley & Sons, 6/30/09

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
History-Social Science Creating America, McDougal Littell, 8/15/06
United States Government, AGS Publishing, 8/15/06,
Santillana, Serie Siglo XXI, 8/15/06,
World Explorer: Geography Tools and Concepts, Prentice Hall, 11/12/02;
World Explorer: Western Hemisphere, Prentice Hall, 11/12/02;
World Explorer: Eastern Hemisphere, Prentice Hall, 11/12/02;
Modern World History, McDougal Littell 2003 CA Edition, 5/11/04;
History of our World: People, Places, & Ideas, Vol. 2; History of our World: People, Places, & Ideas, Vol. 2, T he Modern World, Steck-Vaughn Copyright 2004, 1/11/05;
Economics, Principles in Action, Pearson Prentice Hall 2005, 1/1105;
American Government, Magruder's, 4/12/05
World History, Pacemaker Series, Globe Fearon/Pearson, Adopted 5/10/05
United States History, Globe Fearon, Adopted 4/12/05
American Government, Globe Fearon, Adopted 5/10/05
American History, Globe Fearon, Adopted 9/13/05
T he American Tradition, EMC/Paradigm, Adopted 12/13/05
AP US History, American's History, Bedford/St. Martin's, 10/08/02

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
 
 
Textbooks and Instructional Materials
Year and month in which data were collected: December 2016
Core Curriculum Area Textbooks and Instructional Materials/Year of Adoption
Health
Glencoe Health, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, Adopted 9/13/05

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
Visual and Performing Arts
Art Talk, Glencoe (McGraw -Hill 4th Ed.), Adopted 2/120/04

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
Science Laboratory Equipment Every student, including English learners, has access to science laboratory equipment

 

The textbooks listed are from most recent adoption: Yes
Percent of students lacking their own assigned textbook: 0.0
  

School Facility Conditions and Planned Improvements (Most Recent Year)

General

The district takes great efforts to ensure that all schools are clean, safe, and functional. To assist in this effort, the district uses a facility survey instrument developed by the State of California Office of Public School Construction.

Below is more specific information on the condition of the school and the efforts made to ensure that students are provided with a clean, safe, and functional learning environment.

 

Age of School Buildings

This school has 88 classrooms, a multipurpose room, a library and little theater, a stadium and pool complex, and an administration building.

The main campus was built in 1976. Portable classrooms were constructed in 1979 (6), 1987 (1), 1989 (1), 1996 (1), 2000 (1) and 2001 (4) for Class Size Reduction and growth of population and programs.

Due to a local bond, the campus has been fully modernized over the last decade. During the modernization a complex of ten additional modular classrooms on permanent foundations were constructed. The scope of work included building updates to compliment the educational program’s needs, new roofing, wall systems, electrical, ventilation, heating, replacement rollup doors and new communications and fire alarm systems. Major infrastructure work including replacement of electrical, water and gas mains as well as storm drain and sewer repairs. The stadium was extensively renovated including the installation of an all-weather track. Extensive renovation to all classroom buildings began in the summer of 2007 and continued through 2015 when the final gymnasium renovations were completed.

Maintenance and Repair

District maintenance staff ensures that the repairs necessary to keep the school in good repair and working order are completed in a timely manner. A web-based work order process is used to ensure efficient service and that emergency repairs are given the highest priority.

 

Cleaning Process and Schedule

The district governing board has adopted cleaning standards for all schools in the district. The principal and the Director of Maintenance and Operations works with the custodial staff to develop cleaning schedules to ensure a clean and safe school. Custodial staff work over the summer to deep clean the classrooms.

 

Deferred Maintenance Projects

Multiple State grants will see the athletic field irrigation systems overhauled during the spring of 2017 and a major storm water mitigation and campus beautification project implemented in the summer of 2018.

School Facility Good Repair Status (Most Recent Year)
Year and month in which data were collected: 9/20/2016
System Inspected Repair Status Repair Needed and Action Taken or Planned
Good Fair Poor
Systems:
Gas Leaks, Mechanical/HVAC, Sewer
X      
Interior:
Interior Surfaces
X     Multiple stained ceiling tiles
Cleanliness:
Overall Cleanliness, Pest/ Vermin Infestation
X      
Electrical: Electrical X     Multiple light tubes failed. Multiple solar tubes have failed due to design flaw.
 
 
School Facility Good Repair Status (Most Recent Year)
Year and month in which data were collected: 9/20/2016
System Inspected Repair Status Repair Needed and Action Taken or Planned
Good Fair Poor
Restrooms/Fountains:
Restrooms, Sinks/ Fountains
X      
Safety:
Fire Safety, Hazardous Materials
X      
Structural:
Structural Damage, Roofs
X      
External:
Playground/School Grounds, Windows/ Doors/Gates/Fences
X     Parking lots were repaved.
Overall Rating Good Fair Poor   
X    
 

B. Pupil Outcomes

State Priority: Pupil Achievement

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the State priority: Pupil Achievement (Priority 4):

  • Statewide assessments (i.e., California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress [CAASPP] System, which includes the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments for students in the general education population and the California Alternate Assessments [CAAs] for English language arts/literacy [ELA] and mathematics given in grades three through eight and grade eleven. The CAAs have replaced the California Alternate Performance Assessment [CAPA] for ELA and mathematics, which were eliminated in 2015. Only eligible students may participate in the administration of the CAAs. CAA items are aligned with alternate achievement standards, which are linked with the Common Core State Standards [CCSS] for students with significant cognitive disabilities); and
2015-16 CAASPP Results for All Students
Subject Percent of Students Meeting or Exceeding the State Standards
(Grades 3 - 8 and 11)
School District State
2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2014 - 15 2015 - 16
ELA 54 49 32 36 44 48
Math 26 20 20 23 34 36
 Percentages are not calculated when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.
 
CAASPP Results for All Students - Three-Year Comparison
Subject Percent of Students Scoring at Proficient or Advanced (Meeting or Exceeding the state standards)
School District State
2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16
Science 50 47 50 41 39 43 60 56 54
 
Science test results include California Standards Tests (CSTs), California Modified Assessment (CMA), and California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA) in grades five, eight, and ten. Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.
 

Grade Level

2015-16 Percent of Students Meeting Fitness Standards

4 of 6

5 of 6

6 of 6

---9---

26.4

21.4

34.9

 
Percentages are not calculated when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.
 

2015-16 CAASPP Results by Student Group Science

(Grades 5, 8, and 10)

Group

Number of Students

Percent of Students

Enrolled

w/ Valid Scores

w/ Valid Scores

Proficient or Advanced

All Students

397

383

96.5

49.6      

Male

220

213

96.8

47.9      

Female

177

170

96.1

51.8      

American Indian or Alaska Native

20

18

90.0

38.9      

Hispanic or Latino

203

198

97.5

37.4      

White

152

147

96.7

65.3      

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

264

257

97.4

39.7      

English Learners

56

53

94.6

3.8      

Students with Disabilities

41

37

90.2

29.7      

Students Receiving Migrant Education Services

19

19

100.0

21.1      

Science test results include CSTs, CMA, and CAPA in grades five, eight, and ten. The “Proficient or Advanced” is calculated by taking the total number of students who scored at Proficient or Advanced on the science assessment divided by the total number of students with valid scores. Scores are not shown when the number of students tested is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.
 
School Year 2015-16 CAASPP Assessment Results - English Language Arts (ELA)
Disaggregated by Student Groups, Grades Three through Eight and Eleven
Student Group Grade Number of Students Percent of Students
Enrolled Tested Tested Standard Met or Exceeded
All Students 11 340 316 92.9 48.70
Male
11 176 162 92.0 40.1
Female 11 164 154 93.9 57.8
American Indian or Alaska Native 11 19 17 89.5 47.1
Hispanic or Latino 11 149 145 97.3 42.8
White 11 153 138 90.2 53.6
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 11 209 200 95.7 44.5
English Learners 11 26 25 96.2 4.0
Students with Disabilities 11 46 37 80.4 5.4
Students Receiving Migrant Education Services 11 18 17 94.4 41.2
 

ELA test results include the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment and the CAA.  The “Percent Met or Exceeded” is calculated by taking the total number of students who met or exceeded the standard on the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment plus the total number of students who met the standard on the CAAs divided by the total number of students who participated in both assessments.  Double dashes (--) appear in the table when the number of students is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.  The number of students tested includes all students who participated in the test whether they received a score or not; however, the number of students tested is not the number that was used to calculate the achievement level percentages. The achievement level percentages are calculated using only students who received scores.

  

School Year 2015-16 CAASPP Assessment Results - Mathematics
Dis-aggregated by Student Groups, Grades Three through Eight and Eleven
Student Group Grade   Percent of Students
Enrolled Tested Tested Standard Met or Exceeded
All Students 11 340 312 91.8 20.3
Male 11 176 161 91.5 18.1

 

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School Year 2015-16 CAASPP Assessment Results - Mathematics Disaggregated by Student Groups, Grades Three through Eight and Eleven
Student Group Grade Number of Students Percent of Students
Enrolled Tested Tested Standard Met or Exceeded
Female 11 164 151 92.1 22.7
American Indian or Alaskan Native 11 19 17 89.5 11.8
Hispanic or Latino 11 149 143 96.0 12.7
White 11 153 136 88.9 25.2
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 11 209 197 94.3 16.4
English Learners 11 26 25 96.2 4.0
Students with Disabilities 11 46 37 80.4 ---
Students Receiving Migrant Education Services 11 18 17 94.4 5.9
 

Mathematics test results include the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment and the CAA. The “Percent Met or Exceeded” is calculated by taking the total number of students who met or exceeded the standard on the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment plus the total number of students who met the standard on the CAAs divided by the total number of students who participated in both assessments. 

Double dashes (--) appear in the table when the number of students is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.  The number of students tested includes all students who participated in the test whether they received a score or not; however, the number of students tested is not the number that was used to calculate the achievement level percentages. The achievement level percentages are calculated using only students who received scores.

C. Engagement

State Priority: Parental Involvement

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the Parental Involvement State Priority (Priority 3):

  • Efforts the school district makes to seek parent input in making decisions for the school district and each schoolsite.

Opportunities for Parental Involvement (School Year 2016-17)

Parent involvement is welcome at Ukiah High School. To meet the needs of diverse parents making the transition from elementary to secondary school, UHS offers varied opportunities to contribute to the school. The School Site Council (SSC) serves as the most accessible and critical policy body for parents, students and staff.  Meeting monthly, all critical school issues work through the SSC. Other critical policy bodies include the English Learner Advisory Council (ELAC), Title I, Title VII, Career Technical Education Advisory Council, and MESA Board. Numerous co-curricular and extra-curricular volunteer groups exist, including: Boosters; athletic teams, academic competition teams, and Band Boosters. Parents also volunteer in classrooms, usually in the capacity of guest speakers. Parents are a critical support group for the week-long Homecoming effort. Finally, parent involvement is most common as supporters attending art and athletic events.

State Priority: School Climate

The SARC provides the following information relevant to the School Climate State Priority (Priority 6):

  • Pupil suspension rates;
  • Pupil expulsion rates; and
  • Other local measures on the sense of safety.
 

School Safety Plan

Our Safe School Plan includes the following elements: Annual Statistical Report, Child Abuse Reporting, Disaster procedures, Suspensions/Expulsions, Notification of Dangerous Pupils, Sexual Harassment Policy, Dress Code Prohibiting "Gang Related" Apparel, Student/Employee Safety to and From School, Safe/Orderly Environment, Discipline Rules and Procedures, and Crisis Plan. It is updated and reviewed annually.

 

Suspensions and Expulsions
School 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16
Suspension Rate 0.5 7.0 5.4
Expulsion Rate 7.1 1.0 0.2
District 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16
Suspension Rate 8.1 7.5 6.9
Expulsion Rate 0.4 0.4 0.3
State 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16
Suspension Rate 4.4 3.8 3.7
Expulsion Rate 0.1 0.1 0.1 

 

D. Other SARC Information

The information in this section is required to be in the SARC but is not included in the state priorities for LCFF. The information in this section is required to be in the SARC but is not included in the state priorities for LCFF.
 
2016-17 Federal Intervention Program
Indicator School District
Program Improvement (PI) Status In PI In PI
First Year of Program Improvement 2007-2008 2007-2008
Year in Program Improvement Year 5 Year 3
Number of Schools Currently in Program Improvement 11
Percent of Schools Currently in Program Improvement 73.3 
 
  2015 - 2016
Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff at this School
Number of Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
Academic Counselor 4.0
Counselor (Social/Behavioral or Career Development) 1.0
Library Media Teacher (Librarian) 1.0
Library Media Services Staff (Paraprofessional) 1.2188
Psychologist 1.0
Social Worker 0.0
Nurse 0.8
Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist 0.4
Resource Specialist 0.0
Other 0.0
Average Number of Students per Staff Member 
Academic Counselor 394
One Full Time Equivalent (FTE) equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent
of full time

 

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Secondary)
Average Class Size Number of Classrooms
1 - 22 23 - 32 33 +
Subject 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16 2013 - 14 2014 - 15 2015 - 16
English 25 24 24 19 24 24 32 35 35 18 11 11
Mathematics 25 25 25 20 13 13 23 37 37 11 3 3
Science 27 26 26 6 5 5 24 29 29 8 5 5
Social Science 26 25 25 6 13 13 32 28 28 9 7 7
Number of classes indicates how many classrooms fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom). At the secondary school level, this information is reported by subject area rather than grade level.
 

Professional Development provided for Teachers

The primary focus for staff development includes implementation of common core standards, technology, and development of effective Professional Learning Communities***

***(PLC's - teachers meeting together for staff development activities and examination of student work)

Common Core staff development specifically focuses on three Common Core Standards:

  • Reading Standards 1 and 10,
  • Speaking and Listening Standard 1
  • Writing Standard 1

Additionally, the staff is focusing on instructional strategies to support achieving Common Core goals. These strategies follow the gradual release model of incorporating more collaborative opportunities in classroom instruction. All of these activities are developed with the support of the campus English Learner Coordinator to support EL students in all classes.

Ukiah High School has allocated the equivalent of 8 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) teachers to facilitate technology training and assist teachers with instructional technology strategies on a daily basis.

Increasing effectiveness of the PLC process has emerged from the Ukiah Unified has developed Leadership Network to provide meaningful. This year the site Leadership Network team is participating in training with Innovative Ed regarding PLC development. The Ukiah High School Leadership Team works collaboratively to develop staff development plans and trainings. The Administration and Site Council also work collectively to determine goals for staff development in the School Site Plan. Last year the staff also used significant staff development time to complete the Western Association of Schools and Colleges accreditation process, including the development of an Action Plan to guide staff development for the next several years.

 

Fiscal Year 2014-15

Teacher and Administrative Salaries

Category

District

Amount

State Average for

Districts In Same Category

Beginning Teacher Salary

$42,036

$43,821

Mid-Range Teacher Salary

$59,497

$69,131

Highest Teacher Salary

$81,577

$89,259

Average Principal Salary (ES)

$96,939

$108,566

Average Principal Salary (MS)

$108,297

$115,375

Average Principal Salary (HS)

$119,068

$125,650

Superintendent Salary

$166,400

$198,772

Percent of District Budget

Teacher Salaries

37%

37%

Administrative Salaries

6%

6%

For detailed information on salaries, see the CDE Certificated Salaries & Benefits webpage at cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/.
 

FY 2014-15 Expenditures Per Pupil

and

School Site Teacher Salaries

Level

Expenditures Per Pupil

Average

Teacher

Salary

Total

Restricted

Unrestricted

School Site-

$6,274

$1,114

$5,160

$66,166

District**------

$4,698

$65,963

State**-------

$5,677

$71,517

Percent Difference:

School Site / District

9.8

0.3

Percent Difference:

School Site / State

-9.1

-7.5

** Cells with ♦ do not require data.
 

Types of Services Funded

All students are provided the core program in the areas of Reading, English-Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Health, Visual and Performing Arts and Physical Education. In addition, identified students receive support services through categorical funds.  Specific expenditures plans are detailed in the Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA). The SPSA is approved by the Ukiah High School Leadership Team, the Ukiah High School Site Council, and the Ukiah Unified School District Board of Trustees. 

 

Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate

(Four-Year Cohort Rate)

Ukiah High School

2011-12

2013-14

2013-14

Dropout Rate

5.00

10.60

3.50

Graduation Rate

91.55

86.00

93.67

Ukiah Unified School District

2011-12

2013-14

2013-14

Dropout Rate

6.70

14.00

6.20

 

Graduation Rate

82.19

77.91

84.40

 

California

2011-12

2013-14

2013-14

Dropout Rate

11.40

11.50

10.70

Graduation Rate

80.44

80.95

82.27

 

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Career Technical Education CTE) Participation

Measure

CTE Program

Participation

Number of pupils participating in CTE

668

% of pupils completing a CTE program and earning a high school diploma

19.9

% of CTE courses sequenced or articulated between the school and institutions of postsecondary education

50.0

 

 

Courses for University of California (UC)

and / or California State University (CSU) Admission **

UC / CSU Course Measure

Percent

2015-16 Students Enrolled in Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission

91.42

2014-15 Graduates Who Completed All Courses Required for UC/CSU Admission

30.7

** Where there are student course enrollments.
 
2015 - 16 Advanced Placement Courses
Subject
Number of  AP
Courses Offered*
Percent of Students
In AP Courses
Computer Science  
English 4
Fine & Performing Arts  
Foreign Language 4
Mathematics 3
Science 1
Social Science 6
All Courses 18
 
Completion of High School Graduation Requirements
Graduating Class of 2015
Group School District State
All Students 90 84 86
Black or African American 57 90 78
American Indian or Alaska Native 73 72 78
Asian 100 100 93
Filipino 100 83 93
Hispanic or Latino 93 80 83
White 90 88 91
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 100 100 85
Two or More Races 67 73 89
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 81 85 66
English Learners 35 40 54
Students with Disabilities 90 80 78
 

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Career Technical Education (CTE) Programs:

Ukiah High School received a state CTE Incentive Grant. This is the first year of the three year grant. A complete plan and budget for this grant is available from the district office. This grant is coupled with allocations from the federal Carl Perkins CTE grant and the state Agriculture Incentive Grant. The following provides a general overview of CTE programs.

Ukiah High School is very fortunate to maintain excellent CTE facilities and offer a comprehensive variety of CTE programs. The focus of all of our CTE programs is career preparation in general as well as industry specific skills. Additionally, CTE teachers work with the general faculty during the Wednesday staff development hour. In 2015-16 CTE teachers have participated in staff development activities to support evidence based writing as prescribed in Common Core State Standard. The WASC Action Plan includes a CTE goal of ensuring that on graduation day 40% of our graduates will complete half of a work related certificate or associates degree at Mendocino College. This goal will drive pathway development that includes appropriate dual and concurrent enrollment in Mendocino College classes. Students also have access to community job shadowing with the goal of developing internships. Below is a complete listing of the UHS CTE programs, which served over 700 students.

  • Agricultural Biology, Introduction to Agriculture Science, Horticulture and Veterinary Practices
  • Auto Tech I, Auto Tech II and Advanced Auto
  • Beginning Machine Shop
  • Child Development, Careers with Children
  • Clothing/Fashion Design, Advanced Clothing/Fashion Design
  • Computer Technology - Introduction to Computer Literacy / Career Exploration, Computer Science I, STEM Computer Science
  • Health Support Services - Scrubs and Extreme Responders
  • Photography, Advanced Photography
  • Theater Tech I, Theater Tech II and Advanced Theater Tech
  • Welding, Advanced Welding
  • Woodworking (Introductory, beginning 2015-16)

In addition to our CTE programs, Ukiah High School also offers Work Experience and Workability programs. Business owners, Mendocino Community College representatives and the Work Experience coordinator provide after school employment training on scheduled Wednesdays. Students completing the training earn a certificate that assure a job interview with a local employer.

To assure equitable access to all students; counselors, teachers and administrators proactively recruit in each program. Special population students are recruited and encouraged to enroll in non-traditional classes by teachers, counselors and our Work Experience coordinators. On a yearly basis, teachers are reminded of the need to better serve our special population students during faculty and ROP meetings.

Serving as primary advisers to our Ukiah High School CTE and Work Experience programs are the following people:

DataQuest

DataQuest is an online data tool located on the CDE DataQuest Web page that contains additional information about this school and comparisons of the school to the district and the county. Specifically, DataQuest is a dynamic system that provides reports for accountability (e.g., test data, enrollment, high school graduates, dropouts, course enrollments, staffing, and data regarding English learners).

Internet Access

Internet access is available at public libraries and other locations that are publicly accessible (e.g., the California State Library). Access to the Internet at libraries and public locations is generally provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Other use restrictions may include the hours of operation, the length of time that a workstation may be used (depending on availability), the types of software programs available on a workstation and the ability to print documents.